Men’s Story Project: Looking Within, Speaking Out

A night of stories about masculinity on Brown’s campus, focused on exploring and challenging common notions about masculinity and taking a public stand together for justice, love and equality.
Produced by: Individual Speakers, Recorded Live and Mixed by Mitchell Johnson
Illustrated by:

On March 23rd, 2016, the Office of Institutional Diversity and Inclusion, along with Masculinity 101, hosted a night of stories about masculinity on Brown’s campus, focused on exploring and challenging common notions about masculinity and taking a public stand together for justice, love and equality.

AJ Whitman: Pretty Cool
AJ Whitman tells a story about escaping femininity, only to find that masculinity is just as confining.
 

AJ Whitman: Pretty Cool

Benjamin Koatz: Waves and Eggshells
Benjamin Koatz reads a poem about expressing their gender identity amid violence, expectations and self-doubt.

Benjamin Koatz: Waves and Eggshells

Eli Beck: Twinning
Eli Beck talks about the emotional toll of competing with his twin brother.

Eli Beck: Twinning

Isaac Albanese: “I”dentity
Isaac Albanese tells a story about trans masculinity and accepting uncertainty.

Isaac Albanese: "I"dentity

Juan Carlos Carranza: Special Boy (Niño Especial)
Juan Carlos Carranza tells a story about coming out to his father.

Juan Carlos Carranza: Special Boy (Niño Especial)

Lars Tiffany: To Love and Be Loved
Lars Tiffany, coach of Brown Men’s Lacrosse, talks to his players about practicing healthy masculinity.

Lars Tiffany: To Love and be Loved

Marc Peters: His Footsteps
Marc Peters tells a story about losing trust in a male role model.

Marc Peters: His Footsteps

Ramon Stern: My Gender’s Shroud
Ramon Stern talks about growing up confined by gender expectations.

Ramon Stern: My Gender's Shroud

Scott Turner: Keeping the Book Open
Scott Turner tells a story about his father, manhood, and butterflies.

Scott Turner: Keeping the Book Open

Tariq Cannonier: What’s Really Scary…
Tariq Cannonier tells a story about navigating his Black masculinity in a racist society.

Tariq Cannonier: What’s Really Scary...